Junk Food Pairings For the Lowbrow Gourmand 
From the Wall Street Journal, a review of Emily Baltz’s Junk Foodie:

Ms. Baltz last year published “Junk Foodie,” a cookbook that includes a recipe for Balinese spring rolls that calls for orange Fruit Roll-Ups, potato sticks, grapefruit jelly beans, the inside of a Mounds bar and Utz Red Hot Potato Chips. “You can get fusiony with American junk food,” she says.

For more on how big brands are getting playful with flavor combinations and to check out the video, go here.

Junk Food Pairings For the Lowbrow Gourmand

From the Wall Street Journal, a review of Emily Baltz’s Junk Foodie:

Ms. Baltz last year published “Junk Foodie,” a cookbook that includes a recipe for Balinese spring rolls that calls for orange Fruit Roll-Ups, potato sticks, grapefruit jelly beans, the inside of a Mounds bar and Utz Red Hot Potato Chips. “You can get fusiony with American junk food,” she says.

For more on how big brands are getting playful with flavor combinations and to check out the video, go here.

Tags: WSJ junk food

Recipes On Film

In this beautiful video featuring animated papercuts, Alfred Hitchcock’s films are reinterpreted as recipes. Worth a watch. Or five.

In the words of Alfred, “for me, cinema is not a slice of life but a piece of cake…”

(via NOTCOT)

Everyday we find ourselves consistently pleased and surprised by strange offerings of the Internet.

For example, as we have noted in the past, there is a large surplus of stock photographs of women laughing and eating fruit salad.

Today, for your Friday enjoyment, we thought we’d bring you a new collection. Allow us to present a small slideshow of babies dressed as food.

Who knew there was so much food garb for infant epicureans? We’re not sure, exactly, why this is, only that if a baby dressed as a slice of pizza doesn’t cheer you up, we might be a little worried about you.

Have a delicious weekend!

Schnucks Gets Local

A few years back, we wrote about Tesco’s addition of live egg-laying chickens at the checkout counter. We’re still not sure if backyard chickens are here to stay. After all, why trouble yourself with chicken feed, chicken coops and lotsa chicken poop when abundant and bountiful farmers markets are selling superior eggs for a little bit of cash? Chickens aside, It is true, however, that consumers are redefining quality every day in ways previously unimaginable.

Markers of quality, like fresh and local, evoke an image and elicit an expectation of authenticity. In today’s marketplace, it’s no longer enough to merely sell items; forward-thinking retailers must also create, manage and sell authentic experiences if they hope to differentiate their stores in a way that has significant relevance with consumers. Now, we see retailer Schnuks getting in on the uber local game. St. Louis Today reports:

Tucked behind the Schnucks headquarters in Maryland Heights is a small outdoor garden where zucchini, tomatoes and peppers are growing on raised beds.

Recognizing the rising interest in home gardens, Kathy Gottsacker, Schnucks’ director of food education, thought it would be a good idea to get better acquainted with the trend. This way she can have more first-hand knowledge to educate customers about how to grow and use local produce.

It may not be live chickens, but Schnucks is translating hands-on experience to consumer education.

We believe that by positioning themselves as an forward-thinking advocates for their customers’ lifestyles, retailers can help consumers on a local level in both the world of food AND the world of sustainability.

(Read more on Schnucks’ test kitchen over on StLToday)

We love these food safety PSAs from the USDA. If only the food pyramid/plate/triangle/circle could be this engaging!

For the whole series, go here.

Chipotle Doubles Down On Local
It’s no secret that we’re fans of Chipotle. They’ve got sustainability down pat on the large scale, and are recognized at a community level by employing activities that are easily understood as having a direct impact where consumers live.
Chipotle began its locally grown produce program in 2008, committing to serve 25% of at least one produce item in each of its markets when seasonally available. Last week, the chain announced plans to double the volume of locally grown produce served, from about 5 million pounds in 2010 to more than 10 million in 2011.
Read more over on GOOD, where they want to know what else you’d like to see Chipotle take on as part of its Food with Integrity program.

Chipotle Doubles Down On Local

It’s no secret that we’re fans of Chipotle. They’ve got sustainability down pat on the large scale, and are recognized at a community level by employing activities that are easily understood as having a direct impact where consumers live.

Chipotle began its locally grown produce program in 2008, committing to serve 25% of at least one produce item in each of its markets when seasonally available. Last week, the chain announced plans to double the volume of locally grown produce served, from about 5 million pounds in 2010 to more than 10 million in 2011.

Read more over on GOOD, where they want to know what else you’d like to see Chipotle take on as part of its Food with Integrity program.

Next Level Food Trucks: MoGro Eliminates Food Deserts
via RetailWire:

Short for “Mobile Grocery,” MoGro is the vision of Rick and Beth Schnieders, who in 2010 decided to create “a sustainable solution that would increase access to fresh food, provide nutritional education, and empower local communities while creating a positive return for the company.”

Read more here.

Next Level Food Trucks: MoGro Eliminates Food Deserts

via RetailWire:

Short for “Mobile Grocery,” MoGro is the vision of Rick and Beth Schnieders, who in 2010 decided to create “a sustainable solution that would increase access to fresh food, provide nutritional education, and empower local communities while creating a positive return for the company.”

Read more here.

Tags: grocery MoGro

On $500 Jelly Beans (and Such)

Via Mogulite:

Influenced by food deconstruction masters such as Jose Andreas and Ferran Adria of El Bulli, David’s ‘Beyond Gourmet’™ jelly beans will enable one to create haute cuisine and exotic dishes using the taste elements of each jelly bean. It’s beyond candy! It’s literally an exotic trip around the world though the sense of taste via never-before-tasted jelly bean flavors. Imagine creating a Thai Lemongrass Curry or an Indian Mango Chutney dish by constructing complex dishes in your mouth, and giving it an explosion of taste that hits all your senses.

Read more here.

Congressional Snacking, State by State
We keep finding inspiration in food maps. From this typographic interpretation of American foodways to the New York Times’ informal poll (and interactive map) of what home-state treats lawmakers serve in their offices. 

Congressional Snacking, State by State

We keep finding inspiration in food maps. From this typographic interpretation of American foodways to the New York Times’ informal poll (and interactive map) of what home-state treats lawmakers serve in their offices. 

Tags: infographic

Wylie Dufresne Went to Harvard to Talk About Meat Glue
From Meatpaper we learn all about the rise of the protein-bonding transglutaminases that have recently been causing quite the stir at restaurants like Dufresne’s wd~50:

Long used in cheap, reconstituted meat products like chicken nuggets, the enzyme first showed up on a swanky menu in 2004 when chef Heston Blumenthal made a “mackerel invertebrate” by de-boning a fish and gluing it back together. Blumenthal owns the Fat Duck in Bray, Berkshire, England, which some critics consider the best restaurant in the world. Since then, the binding agent has been championed by other chefs attracted to such gastronomic trickery, like Dufresne, and Grant Achatz at Chicago’s restaurant Alinea, who was once called the “love child of Julia Child and Einstein.”

Word on the street is meat glue may soon be available to home cooks, as well.
Go learn.

Wylie Dufresne Went to Harvard to Talk About Meat Glue

From Meatpaper we learn all about the rise of the protein-bonding transglutaminases that have recently been causing quite the stir at restaurants like Dufresne’s wd~50:

Long used in cheap, reconstituted meat products like chicken nuggets, the enzyme first showed up on a swanky menu in 2004 when chef Heston Blumenthal made a “mackerel invertebrate” by de-boning a fish and gluing it back together. Blumenthal owns the Fat Duck in Bray, Berkshire, England, which some critics consider the best restaurant in the world. Since then, the binding agent has been championed by other chefs attracted to such gastronomic trickery, like Dufresne, and Grant Achatz at Chicago’s restaurant Alinea, who was once called the “love child of Julia Child and Einstein.”

Word on the street is meat glue may soon be available to home cooks, as well.

Go learn.

Tags: Meatpaper meat